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20131202
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
. one of those options from the u.n. secretary general was for him to actually send a u.n. force, u.n. blue helmeted soldiers going. what i think is interesting is he said that if he had to provide the troops, he wanted 6,000 troops on the ground. he said that if the situation on the ground was not per missive, and it you seems from everything we're seeing today it's not, he'd need 9,000, so compare the figure that he thought he needed to do the job, 9,000 to what they are going to be authorizing. some are concerned that the u.n. security council is offering a half measure here. >> compromise is being made on what is a very complex situation in an unstable african country. >> a very complex situation, one that's detearor rated since that coup earlier in the year. in many ways, i think observers believe the u.n. security council has been diverted by other crisis by what's, going on in the congress go and also what's been going on in mali. there are two seats still empty -- no, it's starting now, the security council is starting its meeting. >> we may well return to you as that meeting
call role here. it is, in fact, the sanctions regime that has supported internationally through u.n. security council resolutions, u.s. actions, both in the congress and through the executive branch by the president, by the european union and other nations that has brought iran to the table. because they are looking for sanctions relief. so i understand why the congress believes that more sanctions can only be better. i agree up to a point because that's what brought them to the table. but, in fact, sanctions were meant to change the strategic calculus of iran to come to that negotiating table. now we have to test that resolve to get to an agreement. and any more sanctions at this moment by the u.s. congress would undermine the agreement which calls for a pause by everybody in that regard. and, in fact, might give them an excuse to depart from the agreement that's been made. >> ifill: but in lifting or easing those sanctions, even for six months, even for a temporary period, don't you lose some leverage. isn't that the argument members of congress are making. >> they made that argum
at sea. head of a joint mission between the u.n. and the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons says teams plan to carry the highly toxic chemicals to syria's main mediterranean port. with the help of other countries, ships would transport the agents outside syria and bring them to a u.s. vessel specially equipped with a destruction facility, but security and fighting still remain major hurdles in the country. >> security remains a key challenge for all of us. as you know, the destruction of a chemical weapons program has never taken place under such challenging and dangerous conditions. >> cog is calling on the syrian government to provide support to her team. the end goal is to eliminate the syrian chemical weapons program by the middle of next year. >>> health authorities in hong kong have confirmed the first case of human infection of the 479 n strain. researchers have found the virus in a 36-year-old indonesian woman. she's been hospitalized and in critical condition. health officials believe the cause is a live chicken she slaughtered and cooked while traveling in
of inspection regimes and international sanctions and u.n. resolutions that were in place. we have been able to craft an international effort and verification mechanism around the iran nuclear program that is unprecedented and unique. that doesn't mean it's easy, and that's why we have to take it seriously. but i think one of the things that i have repeatedly said when people ask why should we try to negotiate with them, we can't trust them, we're being naive, what i try to describe to them is not the choice between this deal and the ideal, put the choice between this deal and other alternatives. if i had an option, if we could create an option in which iran eliminated every single nut and bolt of their nuclear program and foreswore the possibility of ever having a nuclear program and for that matter got rid of all its military capabilities, i would take it. but -- sorry, i want to make sure everybody understands, that particular option is not available, so as a consequence, what we have to do is make a decision given the options available, what's the best way to assure iran does not get a n
communication with mexican officials. now, officials at the international atomic energy agency, which is the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog group, are also involved in this investigation and they say there are more than 100 incidents of theft regarding radioactive materials reported to their agency every single year. bret. >> casey stegal, thank you. >>> the u.n. involved in another case saying there is growing evidence that syrian president bashir al assad and senior officials have been involved in war crimes and crimes against humanity. the complex dynamics in syria have the u.s. trying to talk peace with what is literally the lesser of two evils. good evening, katherine. >> reporter: the national security council staff and the intelligence agencies are referring all questions about the u.s. government's contacts with syria to the state department where today a spokesperson tries to play down direct talks as old news. >> we've been engaging with the broad section for a long time. it's been ongoing. of course we're incredibly concerned about the terrorist threat in syria. we've made that very clear. t
hostage? after the break, we're going to ask former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. and north korea troubleshooter bill richardson for his take. and you can't fight city hall, local officials tell one pint-size entrepreneur she can't sell mistletoe but she's welcome to, get this, beg. here's what she thought of that suggestion. >> the pins approximaterinciple need to start working hard. it's not applying themselves. >> and a hot story for all of you in the holiday season. a scarred childhood leads him to devote his life in helping children in need. you'll meet him later on in this show. life with crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis is a daily game of "what if's". what if my abdominal pain and cramps end our night before it even starts? what if i eat the wrong thing? what if? what if i suddenly have to go? what if? but what if the most important question is the one you're not asking? what if the underlying cause of your symptoms is damaging inflammation? for help getting the answers you need, talk to your doctor and visit crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patientadvoc
detonated. belgrade was heavily bombed by the nazi german air force in 1941. >>> a u.n. report ranks sweden as the number one country in the world to grow old in. by 2050 older people will outnumber under 15s for the first time. in sweden it's feared there won't be enough health care workers and facilities to take care of them all. the government is looking at new ways to help people stay in their homes for as long as possible. linda newburg reports now from southern sweden. >> reporter: it's coach time at this nursing home in stockholm. most of the residents are over 80-year-old and have different degrees of dementia. she's 98, and her room is filled with photographs and momentos of her past. this facility tries to create a familiar atmosphere for its residents. it represents the government's models of what an elderly care facility should be. not all nursing homes in sweden look like that, but they could according to the head manager here. >> reporter: we don't have a special recipe pour philosophy. we emphasize human contact and care for every individual's personal needs. we're just doing
.s. military is the strongest in the world. u.s. and n.a.t.o. leaders are meeting in bruls -- brussels hoping to percade hamid karzai to sign. keeping u.s. military troops past 2014. after a second day of talks, paul joins us. >> n.a.t.o. officials meet with afghan's foreign minister. could we be closer to a signature. >> i think the principal you have to think of when you talk about these meetings, is like an apple press. you tighten the pressure in the hope that the juice flows. there's a blockage in the pipeline. it is hamid karzai. he's not willing to sign the bilateral agreement. even john kerry will not speculate as to why he will not sign it. hamid karzai at the moment says no. susan rice went to kabul, he said no. as john kerry says on tuesday here in brussels, there are some 50 nations who are part of the effort to stablilize afghanistan. they have budgetary cycles, planning cycles, and you don't turn off military cycles like this. there has to be planning involved. n.a.t.o. says it needs the signature before the end of the year. n.a.t.o. officials said any signature will do. hamid k
under nelson mandela in the first democratic cabinet. as u.n. ambassador and foreign minister, it was his task to publicly defend the yisent of nelson mandela and other political opponents. privately he maintains he lobbied for nelson mandela's release. >> in 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department. and to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we were making a bigger martyr of you every day stays in prison. that is international. and status. would be growing to an extent where he would not be able to handle it. eight years later nelson mandela became a free man. here you had a man who spent 27 years in prison and the day he was released. he displayed the - he displayed the cuban and energy to the person. who has been a president before. amazing what this idea, in the minds of people and for that matter, into world affairs. >> and central to the success of the process, that led to a peaceful transfer of power, was nelson mandela's insistence that there need be no losers, that all could win. >> we were not capitulating. you do not capitulate and
appealed for an end to violence we want to have the findings are he said the appeal. and that i'm in the u n by and then the coffee the greenback be acted upon. read what is happening at the thought that i'd not thought to look into that now. the landscape studies find that in past wars the canon of opportunity but it's had thousands of protesters trying to seize government buildings mixed thai capital and protest lead acid ted talks of an impact says he won't seem not to step down and on the inactive people's console to see the new prominence to the health ministry says three people died in christ is on saturday nights and seventy one lead intact. another fifty six others were hats on monday. well the situation the inbound call connect and talk to don't respond tended to seek out some straight over that this is the hello that an eu test of fitness and technique last season with the situation of that yes that's right we just got back from one of the state's highest point in bangkok between thousands of protesters and police a very tense situation that much more extreme than what we experie
of the big problems is security. the u.n. estimates that 300,000 people may have already been exploded. explode -- exploited. many in places that they are looking for safety. in schools and buildings like this one that have been turned into evacuation centers. children are unable to go to school. many living in disaster stones. stone zones. we have to go back to the situation before the typhoon where the poverty levels were high here and after the typhoon the communities have become more fragile and desperate. that has opened up the avenue for exploitation of women and children and also of men and boys. as emergency hope starts to dwindle people become more desperate. there is a new way of living here a life of struggle and uncertainty and sexual exploitation. as bad as the arrival of the typhoon was and from what you are saying and people are telling you, the worst days could be yet to come. >> yes indeed, and a lot of aid organizations i have talk the to say the government needs to to unveil a long term plan and the survivors need to have a sense of where their lives are headed. peop
of stagnation. >> the u.n. is marking today as international day for persons with disabilities. saying more than 1 billion people, 15% of the world's population live with a disability. the government estimates 19% of people have one, and many are children. some schools use technology to help kids learn, even if they can't see, hear or speak. roxana saberi visited one of those schools that specialises in eted u kating kids with severe disabilities. >> kids come to the henry viscardi school from all over new york. some, like chris, in an ambulance. the 16-year-old has a disability and he requires constant medical care. now he's on his way to earning a high school diploma. >> since i came here they taught me a lot, that there are no limits, and i can do anything. >> this confidence is in large part thanks to technology like this. >> do you remember how to do that? >> no. >> it's helping 180 students with severe disabilities who might otherwise not be able to study. >> i know what i want. i don't let anyone stop me. >> 20-year-old chelsea can't speak through her mouth, but this helps her to communt
components, and the enrichment component. you had six u n resolution saying enron -- saying iran should not engage in enrichment because they had gotten into a rational actor on the world stage. they are the largest state sponsor of terrorism in the world, including trying to call -- to kill the saudi ambassador there by bombing at a restaurant in washington, d c if you look at the behavior and the three components of the wasram, and i thought this a serious mistake. they made this mistake in syria, if you do not include your allies you would create decision. -- create suspicion. he had these secret talks in om idea,ch was a god awful and even if you like the deal you have created a level of suspicion now on the deal that makes our allies wary and empowers our adversaries use. the missile part of the program is not touch in the deal. they can continue to do missile the filament. the weaponization of their program is not touched. they can continue that. the facility they think they do that is not open to expect her's. if you're looking at triggers and for relation of all the modeling the
past the using fuel crops for fuel has got to have negative impacts. the u.n. estimates 815 million people suffering from under nourishment. what i think the commission are overlooking or don't give enough weight to is undernourishment is tragedies of poverty and politics. the food they cannot afford to buy and nobody is using is used for christmas biscuits or shampoo or fuel is of no consulation to them. secondly, the crops used for fuel were developed and grown in conjunction with the demand for those fuel crops. if the bio fuels industry was decommissioned -- >> we wouldn't necessarily grow anymore crops for food. >> exactly. exactly. a final point would be that bio fuels existence globally on all continents provides a strategic fuel reserve for the world in the event of and possibly with the expectations of future climatic events of greater and greater scale the world will be very pleased that there exists an industry that the feed stocks are being used and have the correct logistic call capacities and employment capacities globally to redirect. >> what's the -- is there a break
. the top u.n. human rights official is linking bashar al assad to war crimes there. cnn's fred pleitgen has more. >> reporter: they are saying there's evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity by the syrian regime and that responsibility goes all the way up to the office of president assad. the syrian government reacted saying they give no credibility whatsoever to what the u.n. is saying and that the human rights chief has talked, quote, nonsense in the poast. they say that rebels have committed war crimes as well. kate? >> fred, thank you for that. >>> a public health alert in hong kong this morning. the first human case of a new type of bird flu is being reported there after it killed dozens in neighboring china. pauline chao has the story. >> reporter: here in hong kong, authorities are on high alert after confirming the first human case of h7f9 case. she recently slaughtered and ate a chicken in the mainland chinese city of shengxen. human infections of the this strain of bird flu emerged in shanghai this year. back to you, kate. >> it's a killing that shocked britain and the
. with respect to the pakistan, there was never the kinds of inspection regimes and international sanctions and u.n. resolutions that were in place. we have been able to craft an international effort and and verification mechanism around the iran nuclear program that is unprecedented. and unique. that doesn't mean it's easy. and that's why you know, we have to take it seriously. but i think one of the things that i've repeatedly said when people ask why should we try to negotiate with them, we can't trust them, you know, we're being naive, what i try to describe them is not the choice between this deal and the ideal. but the choice between this deal and other alternatives. i mean, if i had an option, if we could create an option in which iran eliminated every single nut and bolt of their nuclear program and foreswore the possibility of ever having a nuclear program and for that matter got rid of all its military capabilities, i would take it. but. >> last question. >> but sorry. haim, i want to make sure everybody understands. that will particular option is not available. as a consequence, we have
today that the u.s. is willing to sell advanced weapons like missile defense systems to u.s.-friendly nations in the persian gulf. the move is seen as a way to counter iran's military ambit n ambitions. hagel added that even though the west has agreed to temporarily -- agreement with iran, to limit iran's nuclear capabilities, tehran continues to pose a significant threat to the middle east. many alleys in the region believe the u.s. is withdrawing from the gulf but hagel pushed back on that idea, saying the u.s. will not shirk its responsibilities in the middle east. >> we know diplomacy cannot operate in a vacuum. our success will continue to hinge on america's military power. and the credibility of our assurances to our allies and partners in the middle east. >> following the speech, hagel left for afghanistan where he's meeting with senior afghan officials in an effort to push president hamid karzai to sign a bilateral security agreement with the united states. the agreement has already been agreed upon. but karzai's been dragging his feet in signing the deal, trying
talks about the man we didn't know. >>> south africa has begun ten n days of remembrance for nelson mandela. people have been placing flowers and ca candles outside of his he in johannesburg. mandela will be buried a week from sunday. >>> u.s. unemployment rate dropped to a low of 5%. despite the sol li solid gains e wages barely increased. >>> merle newman an 85-year-old american veteran is freed tonight. he was detained by north korea for a month here is new video of him arriving at the airport in beijing. >>> melissa chan is following the story from san francisco tonight. and melissa we saw the images of mermerle, newman in china. >> well merle new maman is homer the holidays. the north core agre koreans arey unpredictable. the one thing belearned about newman is he was not entirely a normal soldier. he was part of the white tiger a special unit. so see ci see cit secret we didt it until the 19 1990's. kekenneth bay is still being hed what is the possibility that because newman was released that bay has a better chance of getting out as well. >> that san excellent question. >> wh
story. >> thank you. and good morning. a review of the n.s.a. leaked documents show that the majority deal with sources and methods and u.s. surveillance activities overseas rather than the privacy rights of american citizens. chairman of the house intelligence committee who receives regular briefings and has access to the raw classified data tells fox news there is evidence suggesting edward snowden had help when he scored some 200,000 documents. >> we know that he did some things capabilitiwise beyond his capabilities meaning he used someone else's help, we believe, to try to steal things from the people of the united states, classified information, information we use to keep people safe. >> general michael hayden said that snow's activities are permanently damaging to u.s. national security. >> well, it's very, very hard. to be very candid with you, this is catastrophic for the safety and the security of the american nation, what this narcissistic young man has done. >> there are question about snowden's stay at a hotel in hong kong and whether he had contact with a foreign nationa
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)